One of those last jobs to consider before the winter is weather preparation for probably one of the most undervalued of garden assets – the shed. Whether it is a posh shed, a quirky shed or a plain old ordinary shed, it is still the guardian of the garden tools, custodian of the summer treasures and weather shelter for the inclement weather to come.

Sheds have taken on a new lease of life in our contemporary lives, partly because of increased materialism and pressure on living space, and partly because of greater media coverage on programmes such as Channel 4’s Shed of the Year awards.

However, even the most humble of sheds is a reasonably costly investment by the time the concrete base is installed and just a basic electrical supply. With good maintenance, your shed should last a decade or more, so whether it is a log cabin retreat or a basic storage facility, here are some top tips for looking after your shed before the weather worsens.

Check the Exterior

Clear around the base and sides, removing debris. Make sure the air gaps are clear for ventilation and to minimise damp. Inspect the roofing felt and repair any damage. Whilst you are up there, clear gutters or think about installing them to help with rain run-off.

If your shed has windows, make sure these are properly sealed with a decent exterior product available from the likes of ct1ltd. Aim for a tight seal, and clean off excess with silicone sealant remover.

Treat the Exterior

Apply wood treatment or give the surface a clean and apply another suitable water-resistant finish to maintain the fabric of the shed. Perhaps consider painting it with a suitable exterior product to give it a facelift and brighten up the garden.

Keep a Weather Eye

Clear built-up snow or leaves with a broom so that it doesn’t weigh down the roof or keep it soaking. Open the doors occasionally to encourage air flow and inspect for mould and condensation, wiping down with a bleach solution to keep it at bay.

Secure the Shed

The contents cost money to replace, so invest in a strong lock and keep ironmongery oiled so that it doesn’t rust and break free from its anchors. Then you can swing open the door easily in the spring.