For many years British companies have been arranging character-building away days for their employees. While employees see these events as a welcome break from the workplace, managers often see them as team strengthening events and the opportunity to spot potential leaders within their company.

Austerity

The age of austerity following the financial crisis has impacted on these events, according to the London newspaper the Evening Standard, but they remain popular.

Clearly, companies will be looking at value for money from any event, and positive returns to take back to the workplace, rather than see this as a fun reward for their staff. To cater for this, events can range in cost from hundreds to thousands of pounds, depending upon the size of the group and the nature of the event. Organisers try to offer tailor-made events depending on a company’s requirements. The days may involve a range of events and there is a plethora of companies offering everything from assault course tests, zombie days, car racing events and even tank driving.

The latter can be found at https://www.armourgeddon.co.uk/tank-driving-experience.html.

All the events offer a fun element, but the team-building element is normally key. The best days will create situations which will test key skills, help leaders to emerge and teams to be strengthened, and highlight situations where individuals can show their skills in an unusual environment.

Embellish

By taking people out of the workplace, and their comfort zone, they are encouraged to think for themselves in unique decision-making environments. The aim is to create or embellish a skill set which can be transferred back to the workplace. Given the costs involved, managers and employers will want to see results when the event is over, and any new skills learned are transferred back to the work environment.

One of the keys to a successful day will be the suppression of divisive competition, and in its place, the creation of creative co-operative spirit. Fun will ensure the day is considered a success, but the participants must be able to transfer any lessons learned back to the workplace.

This is where providers and employers must combine to ensure the event is well designed and bonds are built for the future. Some researchers have suggested that the most successful away days adopt a new environment to mimic the workplace.